Ron Lindner died: A legend in fishing, a Northwest Side native and a life lived big

Ron Lindner died: A legend in fishing, a Northwest Side native and a life lived big

Ron Lindner. | From Facebook

Ron Lindner, a Northwest Side native, died Monday after a life that changed the way modern fishing is done on the water and in the media.

On May 5, 2016, Ron Lindner posted on Facebook, “FISHING ISN’T JUST SOMETHING I DO —IT’S BECOME PART OF WHO I AM,”

On Monday, Lindner died after battling various aliments. Mr. Lindner led a full life, including overcoming alcoholism and having a religious conversion.

“I knew them way before they found the Lord,” said Spence Petros, Chicago’s best-known angler/fishing teacher.

With a historic reference, he said, “They changed fishing with the Lindy Rig and small hooks and light line. They had that magic act and would run from lake to lake with their depth finders, catching fish from spots and humps nobody knew about. They knew what the hell was going on with the Buck Perry teachings [on structure fishing]. It was an exciting time in the Golden Age of Fishing.”

As young men, Mr. Lindner, 86. and his younger brother Al left the Northwest Side to lead a fishing revolution and build a fishing empire.

“Ron and his brother were truly pioneers in the era of modern fishing,” emailed Jim Saric, Chicago’s Hall of Fame angler and host of Musky Hunter TV. “With social media today, it’s easy to take fishing concepts and techniques for granted. If you go back to some of the early In-Fish magazines, as well as some of the original television shows, you can read and watch techniques for locating and catching fish that are still being used today.”

In 1975, the Lindners led the launching of In-Fisherman Communications Network, which grew to a magazine, a nationally syndicated television show, radio program, books and videos. They started In-Fisherman Professional Walleye Trail as a marketing device. In-Fisherman was sold in 1998, then the Lindners launched Lindner’s Angling Edge.

“At a time in my midlife when things had taken a left turn and I wound up in desperate circumstances, I would call Ron for advice and counsel, as he had suffered similarly years before,” emailed Chip Porter, Chicago angler and former radio host. “He was incredibly insightful, and full of grounded wisdom that would refocus and direct me at a time when it seemed the world had no good directions.”

Mr. Lindner is survived by his wife, Dolores, their seven children and many grandchildren.

Two fishing legends—Ron Lindner (left) and Roland Martin—meet at a fishing tournament. Photo from FacebookPhoto from Facebook
Two fishing legends—Ron Lindner (left) and Roland Martin—meet at a fishing tournament.

IN MEMORY

Frank Juzwik, who made Lake Michigan Angler in Winthrop Harbor special, died last week. He battled COVID-19. Click here for an obit.

ILLINOIS HUNTING

Second firearm deer season is Thursday to Sunday. . . . Last week, 41 boats reported 78 ducks at Heidecke Lake, according to site superintendent Chris Jones. . . . At William Powers State Recreation Area, 18 hunters bagged seven mallards and six other ducks, emailed Nicky Strahl, hunter heritage biologist.

STRAY CAST

Two 6-inch perch don’t equal one 12-inch (Bears thought).

Category Latest Posts